Natural light with a single added light source

Posted By ammirare / April, 6, 2012 / 0 comments

Using natural light doesn’t have to be restricted to simply sitting next to windows, there’s an unending list of potential outdoor locations to be used, but getting the light right can be tricky.

If you try to shoot when the sun is too high in the sky, the direct light will be too bright and harsh, so I would recommend shooting during the ‘Golden Hours.’ I would regard these as the hours around sunrise and the few hours around sunset. During these times, the natural light on offer will be low and warm, offering a far more suitable lighting scenario for a portrait shoot.

 Photo  by Ekaterina Utimisova

Composition is one of the most important skills a photographer can learn.

Posted By ammirare / March, 27, 2012 / 0 comments

Explore tonal contrast

Tonal contrast is the difference between the lightest and darkest tones in your images. It is very important in black and white photography because when you take away color, tonal contrast is all that’s left.

But it’s also important in color photography, it’s just that we’re not as aware of the tonal contrast because of the strength of the colors in the image. Learn to compose with tones and not only will you be a good black and white photographer but you’ll dramatically improve your color images as well.
There are a couple of interesting ways to use tones. Both make good creative exercises.
Creative exercise: The first is to create an image with a small amount of light tones amongst a lot of dark tones. You can use this technique to create quite dramatic images. The viewer’s eye goes straight to the lightest tones, then moves around the image to take in the rest of it, before moving back to the lightest tones again.
Creative exercise: The other exercise is to create an image that is mainly light tones with a few dark tones. It’s the opposite approach to the previous one. If it’s snowing right now where you live this is an excellent opportunity to create images like the one above. Making silhouettes against bright skies is the most extreme situation for this.

Information from  Andrew S Gibson Blog : Writer & Fine Art  Photographer

http://www.andrewsgibson.com/blog/

Photo  by Ekaterina Utimisova

Composition is one of the most important skills a photographer can learn.

Posted By ammirare / February, 26, 2012 / 0 comments

Shoot for line

Lines are an important part of many photographic compositions. There are three basic sorts:

Straight lines such as horizons that stretch across from one side of the image to the other. They tend to impart a serene feeling, that is emphasized further if you use the panoramic format (which is one of the reasons some landscape photographers like using it).
Diagonal lines that move from one part of the image to another. These pull the viewer’s eye through the image and create a sense of movement and dynamism. They are energetic as opposed to peaceful.
Curved lines that meander through the image. Curved lines and S-curves are kind of like chilled out diagonal lines. They help create movement in the image but they do it in a peaceful way. You often see them in landscapes.
Go and take some photos where line is an important part of the composition. Think about visiting interesting stretches of road. Head out to where a rail line comes through your town.

The converging lines in this photo are very powerful, leading the eye from the foreground to the horizon. It’s a very dynamic composition. Diagonal lines add a sense of movement to a photo, and help you create a photo with impact.

 

Information from  Andrew S Gibson Blog : Writer & Fine Art  Photographer

http://www.andrewsgibson.com/blog/

Photo  by Ekaterina Utimisova

Composition is one of the most important skills a photographer can learn.

Posted By ammirare / February, 26, 2012 / 0 comments

Photograph texture

Texture is another element that plays an important role in some photos, and that is more prominent in black and white than color.If you look at the work of the landscape photographers, you will see that the textures of rocks, water, wood and stone are an important part of many of their compositions.
Also important is lack of texture, and there is a strong contrast in many of their images between areas with texture and areas without. You’ll see this most clearly in long exposure images where the smoothed out water balances the strong textures of rocks and other objects in the sea.
Texture and lighting go hand in hand. Bright, direct sunlight flattens texture, while raking side light emphasizes it. Shooting near the end of the day, when the sun is low in the sky, will help you emphasize texture. enough, texture also stands out in soft lighting.
Put this into practice by taking some photos that emphasize texture. Natural scenes full of texture, so go out for a hike or a canoe trip. Bark, grass, leaves and water all create great subjects.

 

Information from  Andrew S Gibson Blog : Writer & Fine Art  Photographer

http://www.andrewsgibson.com/blog/

Photo  by  Ekaterina Utimisova

Composition is one of the most important skills a photographer can learn.

Posted By ammirare / February, 25, 2012 / 0 comments

Shoot in black and white

Working in black and white is an ideal way to learn about composition. The reason for this is simple. Color is a strong element within any image, and used well it is a powerful compositional tool in its own right, but it pulls attention away from the basic visual building blocks of all good images such as line, tonal contrast, texture, shape and pattern.

If you work in black and white, even if it’s not where your true passion lies, you can see the underlying elements of good composition more clearly.
Color is such an attention grabber that it can hide poor composition. In black and white however, there’s nowhere to hide, and that’s a good thing when it comes to learning about composition. If you work your way through the ideas in this article you’ll become a better black and white photographer, and the lessons you learn can be applied when you work in color to make your color images stronger, too.

 

Information from  Andrew S Gibson Blog : Writer & Fine Art  Photographer

http://www.andrewsgibson.com/blog/

Photo  by Ekaterina Utimisova